Order in the Family

Order in the Family

“Everything should be done in a fitting and orderly way” (1 Corinthians 14:40). You agree, but you know this passage was not directed at families. It was directed to Christians to maintain orderliness in the worship ser­vice. Still, it can have an application to family life in the Christian home.

Our God is a God of order—be it in the way we wor­ship, the orderliness of the laws of science, or the order in the home. God established order in the family when he created a structure for family life. Fathers are the heads of households. The father shares this role with his wife, and they are responsible for the running of the home. Parents are in charge. They carry out their responsibility out of love for their Lord and their chil­dren. Knowing this order in the family creates a feeling of stability and a sense of security for children.

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Having an Aim for Your Lesson

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In the last issue of Teach the Word we emphasized that the purpose of a Bible study is not simply to make spiritual smarty-pants out of God’s people so they can answer all the questions in Bible Trivial Pursuit. But since our students must first know God’s Word before they will be empowered to act, we will want to teach with clarity and with purpose. Our confirmation instruction training can be put to good use here. We were taught that every lesson should have an “aim” that is stated clearly after the introduction. The aim is your target. Once you’ve established this target, you’ll be less likely to make your students run all over the field trying to catch your arrows, because all the components of your lesson will drive toward the stated goal, or aim.1 Continue reading

Letter from the Editor: NPH’s Music Principles

Dear fellow musician,

The leaves have begun to fall in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and soon colder temperatures and inches (feet?) of snow will begin to accumulate. But as the natural world goes into winter’s hibernation, NPH is already looking ahead to next spring and our 2018 music releases. NPH focuses on five main areas of new music annually:

  • Keyboard Collections
  • Children’s Choral Music
  • Adult Choral Music
  • Christmas and Lent Kits
  • Hymn Settings for Contemporary Liturgical Ensemble

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The-Homework-Wrestling-Match

The Homework Wrestling Match

Which of the following two scenarios best describes your home?

(1) Just as the supper dishes are lifted from the table, books take their place and are arranged by little hands impatient to go to work. Minutes later the only sounds are the faint scratching of pencil lead and a child’s voice tinged with awe as he or she shares some newly discovered tidbit of knowledge.

(2) As the supper dishes are lifted from the table, the word homework triggers the start of a verbal wrestling match as your child whines and argues and deflects every encouragement to get the work done or whines for help in solving every problem.

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Attitudes About School

Attitudes About School

Some children seem to naturally love school and enjoy doing the work. Others see school as a chore and are easily frustrated with it. Most children probably fall somewhere between these two extremes.

Favorable attitudes need careful nurturing. The Bible tells us, “Pleasant words promote instruction” (Proverbs 16:21). Here are nine worthwhile ideas to help parents put that truth into practice.

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The Purpose of Bible Study

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Augustine (AD 354-430) wrote that biblical education meant “moving the minds of the listeners, not [simply] that they may know what is to be done, but that they may do what they already know should be done.”1

The-Purpose-of-Bible-StudyAugustine’s ancient advice is a good reminder for us all. The purpose of any Bible class is not to make spiritual smarty-pants out of God’s people so they can answer all the questions in Bible Trivial Pursuit. No, we want God’s people to know God’s Word, to believe it, and to put it into practice. What did Jesus say? “Everyone who hears these words of mine and puts them into practice is like a wise man who built his house on the rock” (Matthew 7:24). Christian authors Rick and Shera Melick even made up a word when they wrote: “The goal [of Bible study] is transformactional learning: learning that acts.”2

Of course, our Bible studies shouldn’t be a series of “How To” lessons (“How to Have a Successful Marriage”; “How to Budget Wisely”; etc.). Our lessons will clearly teach God’s law so that we are convicted of sin. Our lessons will also firmly center on Jesus and what he has done to win forgiveness. So yes, we will want to help our students grow in the knowledge of our Savior (cf. 2 Peter 3:17,18).3 But God has also promised that Holy Spirit-worked faith in Jesus does lead to change and action in a repentant sinner’s life (cf. 1 Thessalonians 1:3).4 This change and action is something we may intentionally encourage when teaching. Through the next several Teach the Word articles we’ll explore some practical ways to do that.

1 Augustine, De Doctrina Christiana, 4.12.27. Italics added.
2 Rick and Shera Melick, Teaching that Transforms (Nashville: B&H Academic, 2010), 186.
3 2 Peter 3:17,18a: “Therefore, dear friends, since you already know this, be on your guard so that you may not be carried away by the error of lawless men and fall from your secure position. But grow in the grace and knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.” (NIV 84)
4 1 Thessalonians 1:3: “We continually remember before our God and Father your work produced by faith, your labor prompted by love, and your endurance inspired by hope in our Lord Jesus Christ.” (NIV 84)